Sep. 15th, 2017

via http://ift.tt/2x1INi8:
septembriseur:

bluestockingcouture:

November:

August:

Today:

What the fuck is the goodreads recommendation algorithm up to. Of all the non-fiction in the world, why this.

THEY’RE EXTRAORDINARY CHICKENS

OH MY GOD I OWNED THIS BOOK

Briefly. I bought it for a Christmas gift exchange. I was like, they just said “bring a book”, they didn’t say what kind, I’m going big or going home. This’ll be hilarious, look at this one’s face. It’ll be great. 

Nobody else thought it was at all funny. They were just like, oh, okay, B likes chickens, uh sure.

For the record the photos were extraordinary, shot on Kodachrome in medium-format with a 100mm lens, I was quite impressed actually with their technical merit. And they were glorious chicken portraits of some truly wacky fancy chickens.

But now my dude’s family thinks I’m, like, super into chickens or something, and don’t get why I brought a book about chickens to this gift exchange.
via http://ift.tt/2whmHc3:
fizzygins:

yeah, yeah I know I already reblogged “autobiography” earlier today which is basically about a thousand times more exactly what I want to say than any essay could possibly be BUT then I went and actually read what people are arguing here and you know what

SOOOOOOOO

There are two things that are being collapsed in this argument that we really, really cannot afford to collapse. That is:

For AO3 to be a sustainable project long-term, there needs to be a comprehensive policy in place designed to prevent its users from harassment and abuse; and

Some content that people would like to host on AO3 is, to some people, vile or offensive.

Both of these things are true. However, it does not follow from (1) that we need to regulate or restrict the content of the works hosted on the Archive to ensure the content referred to in (2) doesn’t make it onto the Archive. People seem to be taking it for granted that (1) means banning all that stuff in (2), and that’s wrong.

(cw for high-level references to the existence of rape, underage sex, and anti-Semitism; as well as one marginally more specific reference to kinky sex)

Keep reading
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torrilin reblogged your post and added:

Jesus. I can’t imagine how much it’d hurt trying to get birds to hold still enough for medium format film. Especially if they like you.

Ah, but the credits mentioned that it was a 100mm f/2.8 lens, which means it’s telephoto and wide-aperture, so it’d let you have a fast shutter speed and be at quite a distance. So it’s possible that the chickens were in there with someone they liked, and the photographer was behind a blind or something. They may not have known he was there. Which is what I’m considering doing, if I want to get portraits myself… But yes, digital is much faster than film, especially medium format. 

(also it is hilarious that the post about the chicken book came out of my queue right after I posted a thing about buying fancy chickens, LOL)
via http://ift.tt/2jwd4QJ:thesacredreznor replied to your post “ooh ooh so! They’re getting a new batch of day-old hens in October, to…”

ok i had to look at all these chickens because i’m living vicariously through you. have you considered Araucanas? i like them ‘cause they’re super weird looking and lay colorful eggs. or it looks like they’ve got a rare breed special which looks like a fun grab-bag. i’m so excited for you! someday i will get to have my own weird chickens.

I love the idea of araucaunas but I specifically need multicolored feathers that are neither red nor white, because they have those two colors already. [Not that I collect them, but I could.]

We discussed it, but having the occasional blue egg in the batch would probably be more annoying than useful– it would be distracting and weird to customers, unless we had enough of them that there’d be a green one in every dozen or so. It would just alarm people to open their box of eggs and have one so different. As it is the Reds lay any color from almost white to fairly dark brown, and the gradation is subtle enough that it’s not weird if you’re slightly careful when arranging each dozen. (They also don’t sort by size much, so we try to arrange the eggs within each dozen carefully so that a huge and a tiny one aren’t directly next to each other, so you don’t notice it as much. We separate out the jumbos, but that’s only because they won’t fit in the regular carton.) We tend to wash and carton eggs in quantities of like, 40 dozen at a time, and so beyond washing and sorting them, we’d also have to make sure the colors were distributed reasonably… it’d just be one more thing to worry about. So, probably no Easter Eggers, for now, and preferably no white-egg layers either, though it’d be easier to mix white eggs into brown ones since some of them are pretty pale… 
via http://ift.tt/2xFCzW7:danceswchopstck replied to your post “ooh ooh so! They’re getting a new batch of day-old hens in October, to…”

I’d vote for the silver-laced wyandottes! To me, they look prettier than the barred rocks. The shs look gorgeously dramatic but psychopaths with claws and beaks sound like a bad plan.

The spangled homborgs aren’t like… murderous psychopaths. They’re just… really really high-strung, apparently. They scream constantly and run around and panic a lot.
But this is apparently a good idea for a free-ranging bird, and so my sister says they did very well as free-ranging birds, which was what they had at their old farm out in Illinois. (They’re basically free-range here; the electric fence is to keep other things out, not really keep them in.) 

Oh! There was a tour of the farm my first night in town this visit, and while we were all up looking at the hens, one of them called an alert and all 300 of them ran under the coops for shelter while a loose cordon of the roosters stood guard trying to spot the intruder. (We think it was that they mistook a low-flying airplane for a hawk.) I’d never seen them in full-on attack response mode before, it was really impressive– and it’s a very good illustration of why roosters are useful to have around even though they don’t lay eggs. (They do tend to die in predator attacks at a higher rate than the hens! Fingers crossed, it’s been a good year, though, with very few predator attacks– though the local harrier hawk took a turkey the other day, in a textbook vertical takeoff, very impressive.)

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